Regional Archaeological Research Framework for Argyll

Temple Wood Stone Circle, Kilmartin Glen. Activity on this site began some time before 3000 BC and continued into the Bronze Age, ending about 1000 BC. In that time it was used as a place for ritual ceremonies and funerary activity. ©ScARF

The archaeological sites in Argyll are among the most important monuments in Scotland – with a history of archaeological research spanning over 300 years. The symposium ‘Unfolding Argyll’s Archaeological Story’ which took place over two days in November 2015 at Kilmartin Museum brought together specialists researching the archaeology and history of Argyll to examine and discuss the archaeological knowledge base of the area. A second symposium which took place over two days in July 2016 provided a unique and important opportunity for a diverse audience, including: research specialists, museum professionals, representatives from local history societies and heritage groups and students, to take part in workshops and discuss archaeological work undertaken to date, identify where the current research strengths and knowledge gaps lie, and what direction future exploration and research should take. The findings were collated and developed into an Archaeological Research Framework for Argyll – a strategic document and resource which provides a summary of archaeological knowledge of Argyll to the end of 2016.

The Regional Archaeological Research Framework for Argyll (RARFA) was published in December 2017

1. Introduction (Biddy Simpson and Sharon Webb)

2. Background and Aims of the RARFA (Biddy Simpson and Sharon Webb)

3. About the Panel Reports (Biddy Simpson and Sharon Webb)

4. Towards an Environmental History of Argyll and Bute: A Review of Current Data, Their Strengths and Weaknesses and Suggestions for Future Work (Richard Tipping)

5. The Early Prehistory of Argyll (10,050BC – 4050BC) (Steven Mithen)

6. Neolithic, Chalcolithic and Bronze Age c 4000BC – 800BC (Alison Sheridan)

7. The Iron Age: 700 BC – AD 500 (Roddy Regan)

8. Early Medieval Argyll and Norse/Viking Argyll (AD 400 – AD 1100) (Ewan Campbell and Colleen Batey)

9. The Archaeology of Medieval Argyll (AD 1100 – AD 1600) (John Raven)

10. Early Modern Period (AD 1600 – AD 1900) and Modern in Argyll (AD 1900 – Present) (Heather James and Audrey Horning)

 

 

 

 

“The archaeological sites in Argyll are among the most important monuments in Scotland – with a history of archaeological research spanning over 300 years”

 

 

 

 

 

RARFA was created in association with: